Reminders

Manufacturing Value Chain

Photo of Martin KubáňOffline

Photo of Martin KubáňOffline

In June 2016, IDC's Manufacturing Insights team hosted a third interactive conference in Prague, the Czech Republic, entitled Driving Competitiveness in Manufacturing: How to be a part of Industry 4.0. The audience was comprised of 71 delegates from Czech and Slovak manufacturing companies and specialized IT vendors and IT service providers with a strong Industry 4.0 value proposition. Before and during the event, we fielded a short event survey among participants. We collected a total of 24 responses, and I would like to share some insights derived from this data.


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Does 3D Printing Have any Limits?

By Martin Kubáň

A variety of 3D printing applications were widely discussed at the 3D printing events we attended this year in Europe. Special printers are being used in the manufacturing sector for producing parts from metal and rubber-like materials, or so-called "digital materials". In healthcare, professional 3D printers can now combine bio-compatible materials with photocurable resins of varying textures, transparency, and flexibility. Surgeons can therefore now plan complex operations using CT scan data of patients’ bones, blood vessels, and other organs. This data, transformed into a 3D-printable digital file, can be studied, modified, or printed well in advance of a surgical procedure. Drawing on all the products, technologies, and trends we saw and discussed with participants at events, in the following article we introduce primarily the less obvious uses of 3D printing – mainly involving the printing of very small, and, conversely, very large objects. These uses, perhaps currently seen as less suitable 3D printing applications, actually represent unprecedented possibilities for many human activities.


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This blog post presents insight from the Central and Eastern Europe, Middle East, and Africa (CEMA) manufacturing markets; it explains how the Internet of Things (IoT) will help to overcome barriers to the adoption of cloud technologies and how it will drive investments in the 3rd Platform.


Photo of Martin KubáňOffline

Photo of Martin KubáňOffline

Photo of Martin KubáňOffline

IDC has recently recorded increasing interest in 3D printing-related topics and opportunities from the media and manufacturing audience across Central and Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (CEMA). Back in the 1980s, 3D printing started as a production alternative for the creation of prototypes in various manufacturing facilities. Today, 3D printing technology is still used primarily for prototyping and distributed manufacturing, but we are seeing original and valuable applications in construction, architecture, industrial design, the automotive industry, aerospace, engineering, the military, medical industries, fashion, footwear, jewelry, art, education, food, and many other fields. As a response to rising demand, we are providing a short insight article reflecting the most important questions received, pointing out where 3D printing technology is heading, and explaining what it brings to manufacturers.


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IT security is changing visibly in response to threats arising from the latest technological developments. Organizations must cope with more complex IT environments, including the rapid growth of web-based technologies in business (e.g., cloud computing, social networks, and mobile apps), the expansion of wireless technologies, the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend, and increasingly sophisticated cyberattacks. In March 2014, IDC's prestigious IT Security Roadshow brought together IT professionals, independent experts, and industry leaders to discuss the latest trends and developments that help organizations across all industries to make smart strategic investments in IT security, as well as improve the effectiveness of day-to-day operation. This blog brings a view of this event and presents key messages from conference speakers for manufacturers across Central and Eastern Europe, Middle East, and Africa (CEMA).


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In terms of IT spending in the CEMA region, manufacturing is expected to invest in new solutions over the next five years, making it one of the strongest vertical markets, with IT spending expected to rise annually by 7% across the region and by more than 8% in the Middle East. These broad numbers belie important regional differences that must be considered when developing an emerging markets strategy. Given the importance of cloud in reshaping how IT is delivered, IDC Manufacturing Insights' Martin Kuban answers key questions about how CEE and MEA differ in terms of attitudes toward cloud, legacy, systems, cloud-specific budgets, and what the future holds.


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