Manufacturing Group

 

Welcome to the Manufacturing Industry Group

Our IDC Manufacturing Insights community has been created to enable you to engage with our manufacturing industry analysts, share your knowledge and best practices, and connect with your colleagues.

  • Participate in the manufacturing discussions in our Blogs or Forums
  • Learn about and share best practices, tips, tricks and tools related to business/technology alignment
  • Network with your colleagues within your industry
  • Provide feedback to IDC's industry analysts and your peers

We welcome your participation! 

analysts blogging about manufacturing

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Engage with IDC Industry Analysts

Industrial inspections, regardless of the reason for inspection, can be a very dirty and dangerous job. While not necessarily dull, industrial inspections definitely cover 2 of the 3 D's of robotics deployment (dull, dirty, and dangerous). Industrial inspections can range from inspecting operational assets and operational facilities to inspecting defunct facilities during the de-commissioning process or evaluating the health and risk of non-operational holding tanks. There is no shortage of reasons to conduct industrial inspections, and there is a big business emerging for robotics to be leveraged in the inspection process.

Commercial service robots are robots that perform some useful task, with the exception of those robots operating within the realm of industrial automation or those considered consumer robots. This basically means that any robot that is not involved in industrial automation or for strictly consumer purposes are commercial service robots. This category includes robots that operate within logistics operations, hospitals, in the retail store, providing security services, and even delivering your takeout orders. There is a massive opportunity for commercial service robots to take on tasks that enable people to spend time doing other things that humans excel at, while stepping away from the dull, dirty, or dangerous tasks.

Combatting a competitive market is no easy task. A growing concern of many manufacturers is the potential that they no longer have a tight bond with their customers which can withstand upstart competitors or third-party service providers who can eat away at profits. Recent IDC Manufacturing Insights data highlighted that the top business concern for service leaders was declining sales closely followed by a desire to expand into new markets. These two concerns combined demand that manufacturers innovate with new service products, differentiate through enhanced value, and wow current customers and prospects via value-add experiences.

The definition of product innovation has evolved dramatically over the past five years as manufacturers digitally transform their businesses. The data, processes, and people that touch planning, design, R&D, and engineering continue to expand, so manufacturers need to unify data, digitize processes, and extend collaboration. This approach also needs to encompass the decision support systems and tools that accelerate speed to market and value, and continual improvement of products and customer experiences.

Mobile robots in the fulfillment processes is something that many organizations are looking at as a way to drive up productivity and efficiency while at the same time helping to manage cost and mitigate labor related risks. Such robots are taking on a variety of shapes, sizes, and capabilities, as different vendors build out their vision of the best robot for warehouse operations in the hopes capturing position in a rapidly growing market. The thing in this market is, not all fulfillment operations have the same set of requirements and therefore it is important that there be a wide variety of options for companies considering robots in the fulfillment process to choose from.

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