Reminders

Storage and Data Management

OfflineAshish Nadkarni

2013 was quite a year for the storage industry, in terms of innovation, acquisitions, IPOs and startups - and for the IDC Storage Team - in terms of research, data, taxonomies and new coverage areas. What's more is that 2014 is promising to break that record in earnest. Let's start off this year with some predictions - some of which are already turning true.

It did not take long for me for 2014 to usher in with full force. The new years and the holiday season seems such a distant memory - almost to the point where the line between 2013 and 2014 has blurred. One reason for this situation to unfold in this manner is perhaps the fact that the technology industry is back with a vengeance. For the storage industry in particular, 2014 is already shaping up to be a blockbuster year - the movement having started late last year. Earlier this year, the IDC…

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OfflineAshish Nadkarni

As one of the co-authors of the file-and-object storage report I take pride in how we have segmented this market. I also take pride in working at IDC. So when someone proclaiming to be an industry expert starts taking under-the-belt jabs at IDC under the premise of trying to question the rationale for IDC's market segmentation, I am forced to question his in-depth knowledge of the market (and technology).

For many outsiders, IDC is all about numbers and market sizes. However IDC just does not publish numbers and/or size the markets for the sake of doing so. It backs up this research with detailed taxonomies, primary research and other relevant quantitative and qualitative research. The file and object platforms research program is part of the overall storage research agenda (which includes many other areas that are covered in another blog post). The file-and-object program is an important…

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OfflineAshish Nadkarni

M&A activity has picked up recently. Western Digital, one of the two parties in the disk duopoly has been on a flashy acquisition spree. It picked up STEC, Velobit and most recently Virident. Time for Seagate to make a move? Well wait, before that Cisco had something to say: That it was acquiring Whiptail, a maker of all-flash arrays. Surprised? Not really. With EMC and VMware encroaching on its turf, it was about time Cisco signaled that they were not going to take this lying down. Enough said.

Cisco has been quietly watching the world around it change, or more specifically the data center world.What was once a hardware dominated entity is now being touted as a software defined entity.

For Cisco, this must be painful because the shouting is coming from no one other than some of its own partners, specifically EMC and VMware. Cisco quietly watched on the sidelines when VMware acquired Nicira and started touting software-defined networking as the way to go. Recently at VMworld when…

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OfflineLaura DuBois

Some highlights from recent research on Integrated and Converged Systems

We have seen a shift in sentiment, usage and spending on integrated and converged systems in the past 18 months.  Customers have clearly moved from running these systems in test and dev environments to production environments.  While over a year ago, the focus was on using these integrated systems with tier 2 workloads there has been a shift to focus on using them for more mission critical, tier 1 workloads - and more of them.  In a recent study of 300 IT professionals using or considering…

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OfflineAshish Nadkarni

OfflineAshish Nadkarni

The 2013 Red Hat Summit just wrapped up. Like last year, this years summit was a refreshing experience. Very technical, almost no marketing fluff and lots of energy - like the kind you get to see at open-source summits. Where else do you get to see Raspberry PI and Linux on ARM in action? The central theme for this years summit was Red Hat's cloud ambition - by way of OpenStack, Storage Server and OpenShift. The time has come for OpenStack to become the next Linux. And I believe RedHat will do to OpenStack, what it did to Linux.

RHEL: As a UNIX/Linux Systems Administrator in past lives (I even met my colleague from Genuity days at the summit), I continue to be impressed by the Linux movement. Red Hat which grew out of the plethora of Linux distributions had an impossible task ahead of it: To take its Linux distribution, standardize it and turn it into an alternative platform. It started off with modest ambitions, least of which were to take on the UNIX giants and Microsoft. One trip to the summit and one can appreciate…

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OfflineAshish Nadkarni

I recently a read a book by Pramod J. Sadalage and Martin Fowler called "NoSQL Distilled: A Brief Guide to the Emerging World of Polyglot Persistence". It is a fantastic read. It truly great job of distilling the various "NoSQL" databases in use today. It also describes the use cases (where to use them and more importantly where not to use them). Reading the book got me thinking: One of the reasons why storage is morphing as quickly in the infrastructure landscape is because it is bearing the brunt of polyglot persistence: A situation in which one different data stores in different circumstances. Relational databases (also known as integration databases) is just one option.....there are a plethora of other application databases (also known as application databases) as options. Both groups of databases have very different IO profiles and therefore storage requirements. Ouch!

At IDC we have been preaching how businesses are forced to change thier infrastructure model in a data driven world. One of the results of a unsatiable need to constantly manipulate and analyze data is the rise of a new breed of databases that are known as application databases. Unlike relational databases that forces a round peg into a square hole (meaning that the data has to be manipulated to fit a pre-defined structure known as a scheme), this new breed of databases actually adapt to the…

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OfflineAshish Nadkarni

Last year IDC worked on an engagement to size the market opportunity for copy data. At that time, many people did not even know about this market - leave alone doing anything about it. 6 months later - and finally after a single vendor's painstaking push to make this market known - and IDC's validation of the market - things are finally starting to get noticed. And in the process, that single vendor (Actifio) is getting company. Like they say one vendor cannot define a market...now we have two to tango. And soon there will be many more....

Copy data is a funny name for a large market - the market that has been quietly born out of human psychology. As humans we are victims of security. We desire security at every level - and corporations are no different. Humans that run the guts of the corporation don't want to be the ones that have to deal with data loss - for whatever reason.

So they create copies - copies for data protection, copies for instant recovery, copies for offline storage, copies for the sake of copies - and the list…

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OfflineAshish Nadkarni

The first forecast illustrating the impact of Big Data environments on storage infrastructure worldwide is now live on idc.com. While the WW Big Data Technology and Services forecast provided top line storage revenue numbers, we responded to several clients that were requesting more insight into how these top line numbers mapped to the Enterprise Disk Systems forecast. This forecast also aligns our forecast models to the Enterprise Disk Systems forecast making it easier for future forecasts to be released as soon as the aforesaid forecast is released.

The last WW Big Data Technology and Services forecast was released in December of 2012. It showed that storage and services were the two fastest growing segments in the Big Data Market - which IDC estimates to be nearly $24bn in 2016. In that forecast (and the one before that) IDC never indicated the make up of the storage revenue. This resulted in a lot of inquiries from clients asking for how this revenue mapped to the Enterprise Disk Systems forecast. In other words they wanted to know, how…

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OfflineAshish Nadkarni

The storage for virtualized environments 2013-2017 forecast is live on idc.com. As the first forecast I have authored for 2013, I am excited about it for a few reasons, least of which is the fact that it is based on an updated model that looks at storage holistically. The next step: Storage for virtualized environments in the cloud. That will launch in 2014.

When we released the 2013 Storage for virtualized environments forecast (2013) we acknowledged that technically it was a forecast update - meaning that we were not going to make major changes to the forecast except drop certain ambiguous and perhaps contentious items. For example, storage supplier shares. Subsequently we spent the rest of 2012 and the early part of 2013 refining the model. We made some changes to how storage was accounted for:

  • Tie it to the hypervisor shipments: Using units…
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IDC's Storage and Data Management Blog is the home for IDC storage analysts to share their thoughts on technology, market and industry trends, announcements, movers and shakers, innovative ideas, and recent research.

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