Reminders

Cloud Computing

OfflineRay Boggs

Millennials (born between 1982 and 2000) are attractive prospects in three ways: 1) Interest in leveraging technology; 2) Comfort with advanced mobile capabilities and resources available on the cloud; and 3) A genuine interest in doing things better and more efficiently to improve business outcomes, and also enhance the quality of life they enjoy. But only 6-9% of SMBs have them at the top. In ten years things will be different!

In keeping with springtime and a time for renewal, a number of major technology companies are rethinking their SMB strategies and planning game-changing moves. This is especially true for SAP, which has announced a number of tactical steps to support "profound" advances in the SMB market.

Like other Europe-based firms, SAP refers to the small and midsize business segment as "SME." While adhering to the basic definition of SBs as firms with <100 employees and MBs as firms with 100-999…

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OfflineRick Villars

On January 17th IBM announced a $1.2 billion cloud expansion program to expand its worldwide footprint for IaaS and other as-a-service offerings. With IBM's earnings announcements a day later as well as its decision to sell its x86 business to Lenovo, the Softlayers acquisition last year and now this expansion take on new significance as a key part of IBM's own business transformation strategy. In this post, IDC's leading datacenter, cloud and IT financing analysts highlight some of the most important elements of the IBM's Softlayer efforts and their impact on the types of solutions IBM will be providing to customers.

IDC's chief analyst, Frank Gens, blogged earlier today about IBM's recent earning announcement and discussed how IBM is and needs to react to its changing market landscape.  Two of the major moves Frank mentioned were:

  • Putting a "Real" Cloud Foundation in Place.  IBM's $2 billion acquisition of SoftLayer last Summer has given IBM a highly competitive cloud services delivery infrastructure platform, one architecturally capable of competing with Amazon, Microsoft and others. 
  • Massively (and…
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OfflineFrank Gens

IBM's 4Q2013 earnings - which showed another quarter of disappointing revenue growth - have observers wondering: what's happening at IBM? Will they be able to successfully reorient around the emerging, high-growth "3rd Platform" IT, built on cloud, mobile, social and big data technologies and solutions, or will they become the next DEC or Wang? In this post, IDC Chief Analyst discusses a massive mobilization within IBM - one that started to accelerate 6 months ago - to position the company as a leader in this new IT era. Significantly increased investment scale, a faster pace, and a flurry of moves are underway in 2014; the question is now: how well and how quickly can IBM execute?

On Tuesday, IBM announced its financial results for the fourth quarter of 2013, and the results were disappointing - with revenues down 5% (3% in constant currency), driven by a 26% drop in hardware sales and 14% drop in sales in the BRIC countries.   In spite of this top line dip, IBM financially engineered - through share buy backs, a lower tax rate and cost reductions - a 14% increase in operating earnings per share, to $6.13, 14 cents above financial analyst expectations.  

CEO Ginni…

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OfflineAmy Konary

IDC recently completed a research effort looking at software publishers with roots in the perpetual on-premise world that are transitioning to subscription and Cloud models. Most of these companies profess to be driven by the desire to offer customers flexibility and choice. To the software publishers, choice means that the customer can choose the deployment model and payment structure that works best for them. To the software publishers, flexibility comes naturally with this strategy: by having a variety of options, they are giving the customer the flexibility to choose. However, choice and flexibility are two very different things.

In the context of software licensing, choice means the ability to select how to buy and deploy software from a few good options. (It isn't choice if one of the options is so inferior to the other that no one would consider it). Choice can be very beneficial to customers, and without it today's software customers will be dissatisfied (even if they would only ever buy or deploy one way). Choice can also be a hindrance if there are too many choices, and it is becomes difficult to assess the…

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OfflineMark Schrutt

Rogers buys Pivot

By

On September 21st Rogers Communications continued the stream of acquisitions that have reshaped the Canadian hosting market. Following close on the heels of transactions including Cogeco's purchase of Peer 1, the Bell-led consortium buy out of Q9 and its own purchase of BLACKIRON's assets from Primus Telecommunications, Rogers announced a double acquisition of Granite Networks and Pivot Data Centres. In less than 6 months, Rogers Business Services has gone from a non-entity to the number 5…

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OfflineScott Tiazkun

Regardless if you are deploying your ERP solution on premise or in the cloud, business change is a constant and not all solutions support it well. A new survey that focused on this issue illuminates how this impacts both end users and vendors.

It is important that vendors, who sell IT solutions to vertical industries, don't lose sight of what IT is supposed to accomplish for the end user.  The goal is not about having the latest or largest database or the most elaborate and encompassing enterprise applications system. While IT is important, end users have more practical goals for spending and implementing technology solutions.

The ability to adapt to business change- whether financial and regulatory, merger and acquisitions, or…

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OfflineRobert Mahowald

Cloud seems to promise transparency in cost, service effectiveness, and support, but after years of interviewing buyers - from both IT and line of business roles - of software and services, I've seen firsthand how complicated and confusing it can be for them to evaluate SaaS and cloud services. Smart customers will familiarize themselves with how to read and evaluate the SLA, understand the LoL, and have good expectations about the provisions - what the customer gets back in compensation if the provider defaults on its promises.

After years of interviewing buyers - from both IT and line of business roles - of software and services, I've seen firsthand how complicated and confusing it can be for them to evaluate SaaS and cloud services. These buyers may fully understand the KPIs and functionality they need, and usually can pinpoint a price, and term, that works for them, but they struggle with effectively managing risk at the time the sign the contract, because they often don't understand the give-and-take of the SLA,…

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OfflineScott Tiazkun

At this point in the IT maturity cycle, many government organizations realize the positive aspects of cloud models to address IT delivery, simplification and reduce costs. Indeed, cloud will be the answer to many government IT problems. But just as important will be the type of cloud model that government organizations deploy to realize the promised savings as well as avoid potential pitfalls down the road.

At this point in the IT maturity cycle, many government organizations realize the positive aspects of cloud models to address IT delivery, simplification and reduce costs. Indeed, cloud will be the answer to many government IT problems. But just as important will be the type of cloud model that government organizations deploy to realize the promised savings as well as avoid potential pitfalls down the road.



The growth of SaaS and extended cloud models is seeing government organizations…

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OfflineAmy Konary

We hear a lot these days about the new era of the "empowered customer," with customer experience becoming a key driver of business value. I may be biased given the lens through which I look at the world, but I believe that pricing is a key contributor in shaping both value perception and customer experience. However, in the technology industry, and in software in particular, executives do not pay nearly enough attention to the impacts of their own pricing policies on customers' overall experiences. Customers should stop accepting this.

If pricing and licensing were included in the measurement of software customer satisfaction, the result can best be exemplified by a few representative quotes from some of my recent conversations with software customers:

  • "The bottom line is that (the software producer) scares the hell out of us. They use what I would term strategic ambiguity. The company's Web site says that for further pricing information contact your reseller. You do this and get one answer. Then you go to another person…
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OfflineNancy Selig

On June 27th, we hosted a one hour webinar that was a condensed version of the Cloud Leadership Forum Workshop. Here is a link to the replay for all those who missed out and would like to learn more about IDC's Cloud Decision Framework Tool.


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