Reminders

Smart Grid / Smart Energy

Archives for July 2010 « Recent Articles

Photo of Roberta BiglianiOffline

We are publishing tomorrow our latest IT Spending Forecast report, which covers the market sizing and forecast estimates for the utilities industry in Western Europe in the 2009–2014 timeframe. We would like to give you a preview on some of the highlights:


Photo of Sam JaffeOffline

For more than a year, we at IDC Energy Insights have been predicting that a comprehensive climate/energy bill would not happen. Our reasoning was simple: With 60 senators needed for any legislation to advance, there are too many Republicans and coal state Democrats to make a cap and trade program viable. The final nail in the coffin was hammered in by the distinguished new senator from West Virginia, Carte Goodwin, announcing that he would not support any bill with cap and trade in it. Imagine that: a West


Photo of Rick NicholsonOffline

I just returned from vacation and my home energy monitor is still working - collecting and displaying my home's energy consumption and cost data.  At least the thing's reliable.  I still can't use Google PowerMeter effectively (see my previous blog post) and that issue won't be addressed until next month when my web bridge device arrives in the mail.  So what do I do now?


Photo of Jill FeblowitzOffline

J.D. Powers just released its 2010 Electric Utility Residential Customer Satisfaction Study and notably, utilities are doing better.  According to the survey of 85,000 customers, bills have reduced by 5% and reported outages by 8%.  Communication seems to be the key according to study, as customers with outages are much more satisfied when the utility communicates well about status of restoration.  Surprisingly, though, only one in six customers are aware of their utilities smart grid efforts


Photo of Sam JaffeOffline

For the last three years, the world's auto manufacturers have been playing business history's biggest poker game. GM anted up first when it announced in 2007 that it would build the Chevy Volt--the world's first plug-in electric vehicle. Ford also got into the act, working on a plug-in version of the popular Focus sedan. The Europeans were next, with Daimler, BMW and Renault all coming up with their own EV models. Then Nissan made a splash with its announcement in 2009 that it would sell the Nissan Leaf. Ea


Photo of Rick NicholsonOffline

With the BP oil spill successfully capped, at least temporarily, and the completion of a relief well in sight, it's time to look forward and assess the impact this disaster will have on renewable energy.  Sadly, there's not much to assess.  Since Senator Reid shelved the planned climate and energy bill until at least the fall, it looks like Congress couldn't or wouldn't use the oil spill as leverage to pass a carbon cap-and-trade program or a national renewable energy standard.  What that lea


Photo of Jill FeblowitzOffline

Marcus, Rick, Sam, Jay and I got together one day to name all the vendors now supplying home energy management systems.  Seems like home energy management is to the residential consumer, as Starbucks was at one time to the coffee consumer.  Lots of products are out there to help the utility provide energy efficiency and demand response opportunities to their customers.  So we decided to put together a little ditty, to the tune of "I Am A Model of the Modern Major General" for your summer ente


Photo of Roberta BiglianiOffline

We just issued a new Perspective covering pilot initiatives on Plug-in Electric Vehicles. Our major focus is an update on what is happening in Italy, also leveraging the results of the roundtable discussion I chaired at the end of May during IDC Energy Insights' Energy & Utilities 2010 Forum. Part of the discussion was around business models.



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