Reminders

Smart Grid / Smart Energy

Archives for May 2010 « Recent Articles

Photo of Rick NicholsonOffline

Between January and May, 2010 there were 35 publicly announced investments in North American solar technology companies totaling over $2 billion.  Technology types included concentrating photovoltaic (CPV), crystalline silicon PV (C-Si), concentrating solar power (CSP), inverters and thin film PV.  Types of investments included acquisitions, debt, equity, government grants and government loan guarantees.


Photo of Rick NicholsonOffline

On my recent 10-day trip to Asia one thing became clear to me - the Asian conglomerates, known as Chaebol in Korea and Kieretsu in Japan, are poised to become much larger global players in the cleantech markets.  In the west, most energy industry insiders already know that Sharp is one of the largest global providers of chrystalline silicon (C-Si) and thin film PV modules.  A smaller number probably know that LG Chem was selected by GM to provide lithium ion batteries for the Chevy Volt.  But


Photo of Jill FeblowitzOffline

Quick Take on EPA's New Regulations on GHG

By Jill Feblowitz

EPA's final rule on GHG emissions issued on May 13 impacts high emitters of greenhouse gas (GHG) power generation and oil refining.  The rule establishes permitting requirements for new or substantially modified emitting facilities on greenhouse gases (GHG).   My quick take is companies will need to re-examine their engineering and design, document management, and environmental, health and safety (EHS) applications. .  . 


Photo of Sam JaffeOffline

Number One: Smart grid security is a very evolving landscape and will continue to be so for several years to come. Keep an eye on the FIPS standard as an important part of the overall picture. The electricity system essentially needs military grade security for every node of the network.


Photo of Sam JaffeOffline

At the recent Electricity Storage Association meeting in Charlotte, N.C., most of the news was the lack of news: the conference comprised mainly the same players pitching the same products to a utilities industry with the same "Show-Me" attitude. Although the smart grid demonstration grant program, which comprised some $630 million in stimulus funds for projects related to energy storage gave a lift to some of the companies exhibiting their wares, much of the discussion was focused on what will happen after


Photo of Rick NicholsonOffline

The utility industry has been talking about the fact that lines are blurring between operational technology (OT) and information technology (IT) for the last few years and especially since the smart grid has taken off.  Now ABB is accelerating that convergence in its acquisition of Ventyx.  Most immediately, the deal will provide some cross selling opportunities for ABB to further extend its penetration into North America and for Ventyx products to move faster into markets outside of North America


Photo of Rick NicholsonOffline

Google recently announced that it has made an investment of $38.8 million in two wind farms in North Dakota being developed by NextEra Energy Resources, a unit of FPL Group.  The wind farms will use GE wind turbines to produce 169.5 MW of power.  This is the first renewable energy investment by Google, Inc.  Prior energy investments, totalling over $45 million, have come from Google's philanthropic arm - Google.org.  These prior investments have gone to early stage renewable energy techn


Photo of Jill FeblowitzOffline

IDC Energy Insights has recently completed evaluation of the findings from three surveys we conducted recently in North America to examine near-term utility budgets and spending on information and communications technology, including how CIOs are approaching 2010 budgets given the current market focus on implementing the intelligent grid.


Photo of Jill FeblowitzOffline

The Intercontinental Exchange (ICE) just agreed to purchase Climate Exchange, a collection of voluntary carbon markets, for $600 million.  Some are saying that this acquisition is a gamble, given the rocky road that the emissions markets have been on since their inception.  However, others say that ICE was able to acquire the Climate Exchange for much less than it is worth, and that there is an upside to carbon markets.  In order for carbon markets to work, there will need to be com



Viewed 892,123 times